Why Education is extremely important?

  • March 1, 2016

You may be knowing your A’s and B’s and C’s, but are you educated or just literate? No rolling your eyeballs please, there is a difference. Literacy is knowing how to read and write. Education is to be able to reason, to use your ability to read and write to your benefit and to be able to gain your spectrum of knowledge by trying to surge deeper into the literate knowledge imparted to you. We’ve had debates innumerable about why is it important for every country to increase the literacy rates of its citizens, but is merely doing that enough? No, we do not need just literate citizens, but educated ones too. We do not want to be a group of people who can read and write but make nothing out of it. Wondering what education makes of us? It makes us human, a robot can read and write to, but reason? Do you know that the societal segments were based more on your education than economic worth, just economically better off could afford better education too. Women were the aliens of the already alienated because they weren’t seen as able to mingle in a society where reasoning happened. It is extremely important that you be at par with the knowledge database to be able to mingle in a certain societal setting without being made to feel embarrassed or an outcast. Education helps you broaden that spectrum of knowledge and hold your own mind and reason.

Why Success Always Starts With Failure?

  • March 10, 2016

This may be true, but we certainly don’t act like it. When our mistakes stare us in the face, we often find it so upsetting that we miss out on the primary benefit of failing (yes, benefit): the chance to get over our egos and come back with a stronger, smarter approach. When it comes to failing, our egos are our own worst enemies. As soon as things start going wrong, our defense mechanisms kick in, tempting us to do what we can to save face. Yet, these very normal reactions — denial, chasing your losses, and hedonic editing — wreak havoc on our ability to adapt. Above all, feedback is essential for determining which experiments have succeeded and which have failed. Get advice, not just from one person, but from several.” Some professions have build-in feedback: reviews if you’re in the arts, sales and analytics if you release a web product, comments if you’re a blogger. If the feedback is harsh, be objective, “take the venom out,” and dig out the real advice. There’s nothing wrong with a plan, but remember Von Moltke’s famous dictum that no plan survives first contact with the enemy. The danger is a plan that seduces us into thinking failure is impossible and adaptation is unnecessary – a kind of ‘Titanic’ plan, unsinkable (until it hits the iceberg).

-->